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Imagine you are browsing a list of classes only to see "GaGa for Gaga: Sex, Gender, and Identity.” Unsure of what you just read, you re-read it and find that indeed the university now offers an English class centered around the pop culture icon, Lady Gaga.

Pop culture comes to class

 Imagine you are browsing a list of classes only to see “GaGa for Gaga: Sex, Gender, and Identity.” Unsure of what you just read, you re-read it and find that indeed the university now offers an English class centered around the pop culture icon, Lady Gaga.
 The students of the University of Virginia have this selection, thanks to grad student Christa Romanosky. As a prerequisite to the course on argumentative essay writing, “the students will listen to Gaga’s music and watch her music videos but also read about her influence on feminism and gender expression,” according to the Frisky website. It is an unique concept and a clever way to draw reluctant students in.
 VSU should offer these types of classes. Getting the right teachers and subjects lined up would be a challenge, but it would definitely be a positive addition to the school’s curriculum.
 Using pop culture pertains more to the students’ level of interests and would help the students better comprehend the material, whereas using traditional methods often bores them into withdrawal from the class. Modernizing the material allows students to be more confident in their learning.
 Sometimes in my classes, the ancient ideas and complex information can fuddle my mind, making me hesitant to participate. Teachers want their students to speak up and contribute; that’s why a portion of their final grades includes participation.   Teachers understand not every student will grasp the coursework, which is why some use current movies and music in their teaching. When the material is being explained more to my way of thinking, I have a better time learning it. When the teacher tailors the class to something that interest me, it’s also more likely that I will retain the material.
 Since these courses are more likely to appeal to students, attendance should prove to be less of an issue. According to a 2008 CNN article, 79 students showed up to Yale’s first day of “Christian Theology and Harry Potter”; only 18 spots were initially available. The subject provides an interesting outlook on the cult series, drawing fans in; the fact that the well-known saga is religiously controversial enhances the course.
 This irreplaceable concept spans nationwide from the “Myth and Science Fiction: Star Wars, The Matrix, and Lord of the Rings” course at Centre College in Kentucky to the “Simpsons and Philosophy” class at the University of California, Berkeley.
 With VSU growing in population, professors should consider offering more of these out-of-the-box classes to help bring in students. Due to economic reasons, this vision might not happen within the next few years, but should definitely be in consideration for VSU’s future.

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