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Editorial: Cultures are not your Halloween costumes

Halloween is right around the corner and now is a great time to remind you not to make different cultures and serial killers your Halloween costumes.

On Wednesday, Oct. 19, VSU’s Student Diversity and Inclusion sent an e-mail to students and faculty with a flyer announcing that we should be aware that our fun should not be at the expense of others.

“You wear the costume for one night, I wear the stigma for life,” a quote is stated at the bottom of the PSA.

Dressing with a kimono, putting on an afro wig, wearing a Native American headdress and wearing makeup that is entirely too dark for your skin tone to impersonate someone else is simply cultural appropriation.

The people of these cultures were persecuted throughout the course of history just to be sold at Spirit Halloween as “Adult Exquisite Cleo Costume” featuring two slits which, according to their website, are “perfect for showing off your inner goddess.”

Putting on a blonde wig, Aviator eyeglasses and orange jumpsuit is completely off-putting and idolizing a serial killer.

Even eBay has banned the sale of costumes that glorify the well-known serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer, claiming that the costume violates the policy regarding violence and criminals. Dahmer’s victims have family members who are still alive so having costumes that give him a legacy when he doesn’t deserve it is incredibly insulting.

There are millions of other costumes that don’t involve any sort of offensive terms. You can dress as an animal and not have to worry about possibly offending someone and you can have fun with it with friends.

There have been many different news stories circulating that there is not one person who doesn’t know about cultural appropriation. Many people may still wear offensive costumes out of innocence or out of plain ignorance.

Just do many cultures a favor and think twice before you consider wearing a transphobic, racist or offensive costume out for partying or trick-or-treating.

This editorial reflects the general opinion of The Spectator staff. 

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